Sequel to Synopsis of the tariffs and trade of the British Empire
Read Online
Share

Sequel to Synopsis of the tariffs and trade of the British Empire prepared, and presented to the Commercial Committee of the Imperial Federation League. by Rawson, Rawson William Sir

  • 25 Want to read
  • ·
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Imperial Federation League in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • England -- Commerce and industries

Book details:

The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 161 p. table.
Number of Pages161
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16218155M

Download Sequel to Synopsis of the tariffs and trade of the British Empire

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

This banner text can have markup.. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Abstract. Continues the author's Synopsis of the tariffs and trade of the British Empire, London, Mode of access: Internet. Imperial Federation League: Sequel to Synopsis of the tariffs and trade of the British Empire / (London: Printed by order of the Executive Committee and published at the office of the Imperial Federation League, ), also by Rawson William Rawson (page images at HathiTrust). Niall Ferguson, author of this book's sequel, "Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire," gives his readers a crash-course in British imperial history starting with the English privateering raids on the Spanish empire and ending with the Suez Canal Crisis of /5.

Show Summary Details Preview. The argument about the limits of free trade or protectionism rages throughout the world to this day. Following the repeal of the Corn Laws in , free trade became one of the most distinctive defining features of the British state, and of British . The World Trade Organization was established in to provide a forum for negotiating and enforcing trade treaties covering its more than participating nations. It succeeded a less formal club known as GATT, the General Agreement on Tariffs and : Lawrence H. White. Imperial Preference was a system of reciprocally-enacted tariffs or free trade agreements between constituent units of the British Empire. As Commonwealth Preference, the proposal was later revived in regard to the members of the Commonwealth of Nations. Joseph Chamberlain, the powerful colonial secretary from until , argued vigorously that Britain could compete with its growing . The pattern of trade for Britain continued for much of the century with new markets being found not in the British Empire but in Latin and South America, the Middle East and China. In when exports from Britain amounted to £ million, exports to non- Empire territories amounted to £ million.

The argument about the limits of free trade or protectionism rages throughout the world to this day. Following the repeal of the Corn Laws in , free trade became one of the most distinctive defining features of the British state, and of British economic, social, and political life. While the United States, much of the British Empire, and the leading European Powers turned towards Author: Anthony Howe. The British Empire was created by private interest to create wealth and trade remained the main motive for empire although in the Victorian era other motives came to play a part in the extension of the empire's territories. Free trade, at least in its most unbridled form, was a huge negative for less developed parts of the British empire, which have benefited from some measures of protection. The Irish were a case it point; they were so far behind England economically that opening grain trade would send grain from Irish farms to British manufacturing towns. Sequel to synopsis of the tariffs and trade of the British Empire / prepared and presented to the Commercial Committee by Rawson W. Rawson Rawson, Rawson William Sir [ Book: ] View online (access conditions) At 2 libraries.